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April 18, 2013
Darryl Geddes 315 464-4828

Conference examines bullying and how to break the cycle of violence

SYRACUSE, N.Y.— Barbara Coloroso, an author and leading expert on bullying, will be the key presenter at a conference on The Bully, The Bullied, and the Bystander: Breaking the Cycle of Violence, to be held Tuesday, April 30, at the Drumlins Country Club, 800 Nottingham Road, Syracuse.

The conference, which runs from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., will include a series of workshops as well as the presentation by Coloroso, author of the bestseller “The Bully, The Bullied and The Bystander” (William Morrow Paperbacks, 2009). Lunch and refreshments will also be provided. The conference is sponsored the Kohl’s Austim and Related Disorders Program at the Margaret L. Williams Developmental Evaluation Center, Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital, the New York Office for People with Developmental Disabilities and Kohl’s Cares.

Coloroso’s book is aimed at helping parents, teachers, caregivers and most of all, children, to understand what it takes to break the cycle of bullying.

Coloroso notes that much has been learned about bullying in the last decade due, in large part, to the vast amount of research now being done in this area, especially work that highlights those most likely to be bullied.

“In 1999, bullying was still a mystery,” Coloroso said. “I studied special education in both my undergraduate and graduate studies and have been speaking about bullying for over 40 years. A majority of the kids who are bullied are kids with special needs because they miss certain social cues, and that unfortunately makes them prime targets.”

The conference aims to teach parents, educators, caregivers, and anyone who works with children the signs and symptoms of bullying, ways to avoid their children from becoming a bully or being bullied, and how to protect the people around them if they see bullying occurring.

“Lectures such as this help people understand that we are all interdependent when it comes to bullying, and we all have a job to do in order to end bullying once and for all,” Coloroso said.

In addition to her book on bullying, Coloroso also has penned Parenting Through Crisis—Helping Kids in Time of Loss, Grief and Change (Quill, 2001), and Just Because It’s Not Wrong Doesn’t Make It Right: From Toddlers to Teens, Teaching Kids to Think and Act Ethically (Penguin Global, 2008).

One of the conference’s key organizers, Carroll Grant, PhD, director of Upstate’s Margaret L. Williams Developmental Evaluation Center and member of the faculty at Upstate Medical University, believes that this conference is an integral part of helping to end bullying.

“New York state is still identifying bullying as a big issue and so it needs to continue to be researched and talked about,” Grant said. “No parent wants their kids to be a bully, or even bullied, but a lot of times that ends up happening. This conference will help everyone understand how to play an active role in the prevention of bullying because it could one day happen to you or to someone that you love.”

Registration for the conference is open until noon Tuesday, April 23.

To register and receive more information on the conference, visit Autism.

For more information regarding the keynote speaker and bullying, visit Coloroso. Conference examines bullying and how to break the cycle of violence

Barbara Coloroso, an author and leading expert on bullying, will the featured presenter at the April 30 conference, which is sponsored in part by Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital

SYRACUSE, N.Y.— Barbara Coloroso, an author and leading expert on bullying, will be the key presenter at a conference on The Bully, The Bullied, and the Bystander: Breaking the Cycle of Violence, to be held Tuesday, April 30, at the Drumlins Country Club, 800 Nottingham Road, Syracuse.

The conference, which runs from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., will include a series of workshops as well as the presentation by Coloroso, author of the bestseller “The Bully, The Bullied and The Bystander” (William Morrow Paperbacks, 2009). Lunch and refreshments will also be provided. The conference is sponsored the Kohl’s Austim and Related Disorders Program at the Margaret L. Williams Developmental Evaluation Center, Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital, the New York Office for People with Developmental Disabilities and Kohl’s Cares.

Coloroso’s book is aimed at helping parents, teachers, caregivers and most of all, children, to understand what it takes to break the cycle of bullying.

Coloroso notes that much has been learned about bullying in the last decade due, in large part, to the vast amount of research now being done in this area, especially work that highlights those most likely to be bullied.

“In 1999, bullying was still a mystery,” Coloroso said. “I studied special education in both my undergraduate and graduate studies and have been speaking about bullying for over 40 years. A majority of the kids who are bullied are kids with special needs because they miss certain social cues, and that unfortunately makes them prime targets.”

The conference aims to teach parents, educators, caregivers, and anyone who works with children the signs and symptoms of bullying, ways to avoid their children from becoming a bully or being bullied, and how to protect the people around them if they see bullying occurring.

“Lectures such as this help people understand that we are all interdependent when it comes to bullying, and we all have a job to do in order to end bullying once and for all,” Coloroso said.

In addition to her book on bullying, Coloroso also has penned Parenting Through Crisis—Helping Kids in Time of Loss, Grief and Change (Quill, 2001), and Just Because It’s Not Wrong Doesn’t Make It Right: From Toddlers to Teens, Teaching Kids to Think and Act Ethically (Penguin Global, 2008).

One of the conference’s key organizers, Carroll Grant, PhD, director of Upstate’s Margaret L. Williams Developmental Evaluation Center and member of the faculty at Upstate Medical University, believes that this conference is an integral part of helping to end bullying.

“New York state is still identifying bullying as a big issue and so it needs to continue to be researched and talked about,” Grant said. “No parent wants their kids to be a bully, or even bullied, but a lot of times that ends up happening. This conference will help everyone understand how to play an active role in the prevention of bullying because it could one day happen to you or to someone that you love.”

Registration for the conference is open until noon Tuesday, April 23.

To register and receive more information on the conference, visit Autism.

For more information regarding the keynote speaker and bullying, visit Coloroso.

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