Major Research Areas

Upstate boasts basic and clinical researchers with diverse expertise in neuroscience, molecular genetics, genomics, epigenetics, structural biology, infectious disease, and behavior disorders. This allows students the opportunity to perform research in a wide range of research areas and easily collaborate when new expertise is needed.

Bihchen Hwang, DDS, PhD

Bihchen Hwang, DDS, PhD
Appointed 09/15/95
2279 Weiskotten Hall
766 Irving Ave.
Syracuse, NY 13210

315 464-5440

Current Appointments

Hospital Campus

  • Downtown

Research Programs and Affiliations

  • Biomedical Sciences Program
  • Microbiology and Immunology
  • Research Pillars

Education & Fellowships

  • PhD: University of Texas, 1989

Research Interests

  • DNA replication of herpes viruses.

Publications

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Research Abstract

Fidelity of herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA replication

We are investigating the mechanisms governing the fidelity of HSV DNA replication that plays the critical roles in the emergence of mutations leading to resistance to antiviral drugs. Current efforts are focusing on examining the effects of different mutations of the polymerase and the processivity factor, the UL42, on the fidelity of DNA replication. Also, by using a novel mutagenesis system, we are characterizing whether the DNA replication accuracy could be influenced by the position effect.

Drug resistance of human cytomegalovirus (CMV)

Drug resistance is the major problem of successful treatment of human cytomegalovirus. Our current researches include the development of a novel and rapid method for the detection of drug resistant strains, including both polymerase and UL97 mutants, from clinical samples. We are also investigating the natural substrate of UL97, the kinase responsible for phosphorylating the antiviral drug ganciclovir. The findings could be useful for the future development of new antiviral reagents. These researches will be beneficial to the clinical treatment of CMV infections, especially for immuno-suppressed individuals.

Selected References

Hwang Y. T., Hwang C. B. C. (2003). Exonuclease-deficient polymerase mutant of herpes simplex virus type 1 induces altered spectra of mutations. J. Virol. 77(5):2946-2955.

Hwang Y. T., Wang Y. A., Lu Q., Hwang C.B.C. (2003). Thymidine kinase of herpes simplex virus type 1 strain KOS lacks mutator activity. Virology. 305(2):388-396.

Lu, Q., Hwang, Y. T., and Hwang, C. B. C. (2002). Detection of mutations within the thymidine kinase gene of herpes simplex virus type 1 by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. J. Virol. Methods. 99:1-7.

Hwang, Y. T., Liu, B-Y., and Hwang, C. B. C. (2002). Replication fidelity fo the supF gene integrated in the thymidine kinase locus of herpes simplex virus type 1. J. Virol.76:3605-3614.

Lu, Q., Hwang, Y. T., and Hwang, C. B. C. (2002). Mutation spectra of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase mutants. J. Virol. 76:5822-5828

Faculty Profile Shortcut: http://www.upstate.edu/faculty/hwangc