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Linking the Ages: connecting medical students with our seniors.
Linking the Ages: connecting medical students with our seniors.
Linking the Ages: connecting medical students with our seniors.
Linking the Ages: connecting medical students with our seniors.
Linking the Ages: connecting medical students with our seniors.
Linking the Ages: connecting medical students with our seniors.
Linking the Ages: connecting medical students with our seniors.
Linking the Ages: connecting medical students with our seniors.
Linking the Ages: connecting medical students with our seniors.

Curriculum

Our Curriculum is an important document that defines the educational goals of our Residency Training Program and is intended to clarify the learning objectives for all inpatient and outpatient rotations. Our program requirements are based on the ACGME External Icon standards for categorical training in Internal Medicine.

This is a document that will change over time and is developed based on the following principles:

  • The Curriculum was developed and updated by broad representation of faculty and residents.
  • The Curriculum will define clearly the expectations of junior and senior residents on specific rotations. This is to help insure that our residents are gradually increasing their responsibility in regard to patient care and teaching responsibilities.
  • It also reflects the expectation that medical knowledge will gradually increase at different levels and that much of that learning is self-directed. It is also expected, as resident's progress through the 3-year training program that their skills with practice-based learning and the application and improvement or complex systems that we work in continue to improve throughout the 3-year training cycle.
  • The primary goal of our Curriculum is to assist in training excellent internists who can successfully:
    • Practice quality medicine in both the inpatient and outpatient setting
    • Pursue subspecialty training
    • Develop skills as an educator
    • Participate in research

It is our hope that our residents will continually exhibit intellectual curiosity and that they will bring that style of practice to their patient care. This is best accomplished by being well trained in practice-based learning.

It is difficult to convey in a Curriculum our very high standard of professionalism and ethical conduct that we model and expect from all of our residents.

Graduate medical education by nature involves a great deal or self-directed learning. Our hope is that the Curriculum will serve as a helpful template to guide learning and clinical maturation throughout all years of training.

Our electronic evaluation system is intended to reflect on a timely basis fair evaluations of the residents' performance. MedHub also allows us to clearly track development in all of the 6 core competencies. Residents are expected to meet minimum standards in the 6 core competencies and are strongly encouraged to develop excellence in all of these.

Those 6 core competencies include:

  1. Patient Care PDF Icon
  2. Medical Knowledge PDF Icon
  3. Interpersonal and Communication Skills PDF Icon
  4. Professionalism PDF Icon
  5. Practice-based Learning PDF Icon
  6. Systems-based Practice PDF Icon

Community Based Learning Curriculum

LinkAges is a new program at Upstate Medical University's College of Medicine intended to improve geriatric care by advancing student-patient relationships.

GERIATRIC PROGRAM FUND

A gift to the GERIATRIC PROGRAM FUND at the Upstate Medical University Foundation will help support this valuable program, which is dependent on grant funding.

Please give today.

LinkAges brings together senior citizens and first-, second- and third-year medical students, giving students hands on, person-to-person experience in geriatric care years earlier than they previously received.

First-year Students

First-year students begin their geriatric experience by interacting with healthy older adults at a variety of senior center sites in the community. They take health histories, give flu shots and become more familiar with issues regarding an aging but generally healthy population.

Second-year Students

Second-year students visit patients who live at home and are mobile but may be more frail than their peers who are out enjoying what senior centers have to offer.

Third-year students

The settings for third-year students are a senior housing facility and skilled nursing home, where they study and experience firsthand various geriatric syndromes and conditions which do not fall within the purview of traditional medical education.

Such topics include:
  • Malnutrition and Dehydration
  • Medications and Polypharmacy
  • Falls and Gait Instability
  • Additional Topics