Our Surgery Options

Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Gastric Sleeve

Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass

Gastric Sleeve

How is the surgery done?

A small 15-30 ml gastric pouch is connected to the small intestine bypassing the stomach allowing food and digestive juices to be separated for 34 feet.

A thin vertical sleeve of the stomach is made by using a stapling device. The portion of the stomach that is removed is taken out of the abdomen.

The sleeve typically holds 50-150 ml and is about the size of a banana.

How does it work?

Significantly restricts the volume of food that can be eaten.

Some "malabsorption" will occur because of the bypassed portion of the small intestine.

"Dumping Syndrome" may be experienced if the wrong foods such as sugar or fats are eaten.

Moderately limits the amount of food that can be eaten at a meal.

Food goes through the digestive tract in the normal manner, so there is no "malabsoprtion."

No future adjustments have to be made.

What type of surgical approach is used?

Laparoscopic (i.e. minimally invasive) in which 6 small (5-10 mm) cuts are used.

-Or-

Open approach in which a traditional mid-line abdominal cut is used.

Laparoscopic (i.e. minimally invasive) in which 6 small (5-10 mm) cuts are used.

-Or-

Open approach in which a traditional mid-line abdominal cut is used.

How much weight can I expect to lose?

The average weight loss is 65% of the excess (based on our own data).

In clinical studies, patients have lost an average of 55% of their excess weight.

What diet and lifestyle changes are required?

Patients must consume less than 800 calories per day in the first 12-18 months; 1000-1200 calories thereafter.

Must include 3 small high protein meals per day.

No drinking with meals.

Must avoid sugar and fats to prevent "Dumping Syndrome."

Vitamin deficiency/protein deficiency are usually preventable with proper diet, follow-up and supplements.

Must exercise (e.g. walk 10,000 steps per day using pedometer).

Patients must consume less than 800 calories per day in the first 18-36 months; 1000-1200 calories thereafter.

No drinking with meals (can drink 30 minutes before and 45 minutes after a meal).

Must include 3 small high protein meals per day ~ approximately 1/2 cup.

Must avoid concentrated sweets and high fat foods.

Vitamin deficiency/protein deficiency are usually preventable with proper diet, follow-up and supplements.

Must exercise (e.g. walk 10,000 steps per day using a pedometer).

What lifetime nutritional supplements will I need?

Multivitamin
Calcium
Vitamin B12
Iron

Multivitamin
Calcium
Vitamin B12

How quickly will I lose the extra weight?

Patients will experience rapid weight loss in the first few months.

Around the one to one and a half year mark the weight loss will plateau.

The weight loss is often followed by some weight regain and stabilization depending on patient compliance with diet and exercise.

Patients will experience greater weight loss than with the band and slightly slower weight loss than with the gastric bypass.

The weight loss is often followed by some weight regain and stabilization depending on patient compliance with diet and exercise.

How long will I be in the operating room?

70 minutes (Avg.)

60-75 minutes (Avg.)

How long will I need to stay in the hospital?

2 days (48 hrs.)

2 days (48 hrs.)

When can I return to work?

Not until your surgeon says it is ok but some patients can return to desk jobs within 2 weeks of surgery.

Not until your surgeon says it is ok but some patients can return to desk jobs within 2 weeks of surgery.

When is my first follow up with my surgeon?

1-2 weeks after surgery.

1-2 weeks after surgery.

Where is the surgery performed?

University Hospital at SUNY Upstate Medical University.

University Hospital at SUNY Upstate Medical University.

How long must I wait to have surgery?

Most patients average 3 to 6 months of preoperative training and preparation.

Most patients average 3 to 6 months of preoperative training and preparation.

Who pays for the surgery?

Your insurance (provided your insurance carrier approves the surgery).

Your insurance (provided your insurance carrier approves the surgery).

Is the operation reversible?

It is not recommended except in very unusual circumstances.

Weight regain is almost a certainty.

NO Since the part of the stomach that is detached is removed, the operation is not reversible.

What operation is best for me?

Most effective for patients with a BMI of >=35 (with comorbidity) or >40 especially those with a "sweet-tooth."

It takes away the hunger and produces 10-15% more weight loss then Adjustable Gastric Banding.

It is considered the "Gold Standard Procedure" for weight loss in North America.

Most effective for patients with a BMI of >=35 (with comorbidity) or >40

You and your physician will discuss the options and after being informed on the risks and benefits of each procedure, you will ultimately make the decision.