MSI Courses (AY 2016-2017)

Circulatory, Respiratory I

Course #: MCIR101
Course Credit: 5
Directors:
     Gary Johnson, MD (Emergency Medicine)
     Robert Zajdel, PhD (Cell and Developmental Biology)
Coordinator:
     Julie Ritchie

This unit will emphasize medical knowledge as it applies to cardiovascular and respiratory disease. Learning objectives include anatomic structure and physiologic function of the heart, lungs, airways and blood vessels.  We will be folding in clinical, laboratory, radiologic, and pathologic data into the basic science taught through this new curriculum. Large lectures, small group studies, and case-based sessions will reinforce unit learning objectives and engage the student to develop life-long learning skills.

Endocrine, Reproductive

Course #: MENR101
Course Credit: 5
Directors:
     Rachel Hopkins, MD (Medicine)
     Mary Lou Vallano, PhD (Neuroscience and Physiology)
Coordinator:
     TBD

In this unit, students will learn to recognize and understand the normal structure and function of the major endocrine, and reproductive organs and glands.  This includes the hypothalamus, pituitary, adrenal, thyroid, parathyroid, pancreas, gonads and reproductive organs.  Foundational lectures on vitamins and minerals are also included.  Students will gain an understanding of the intricate interplay of hormonal pathways that contribute to normal endocrine and reproductive function.   Using clinical, laboratory, radiologic and pathologic data, students will begin to identify the ways in which the balance of these systems can be disturbed, leading to common and uncommon endocrine and reproductive disorders.

Foundations of Reasoning in Medicine (FRM)

Course #: MPPH102
Course Credit: 5
Director:
     William Paolo, MD (Emergency Medicine)
Coordinators:
     TBH

This longitudinal course integrates clinical, ethical and societal medical reasoning into our curriculum.  FRM is an active, case-based learning course that will integrate with the new horizontally constructed anatomical units of year 1 and 2, in order to align with content for each individual block.  These interactive sessions will be in a small group format to allow students to model not only the clinical case thought process but also Ethics, Law and Social Issues (ELSI) and Population Health, Preventive Medicine (PHPM) components.  These additional components help students fulfill their professional responsibilities both to individual patient and the broader population.

Gastrointestinal System

Course #: MGSI101
Course Credit: 5
Directors:
     Mark Schmitt, PhD (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology)
     Ron Szyjowski, MD (Medicine)
Coordinator: 
    
Sandra Jarvis

This unit will provide a comprehensive and thorough coverage of the normal gastrointestinal tract.  Special attention will be given to specific disease states and clinical presentations and how they arise from both changes in physiology, cell structure and the underlying metabolic disruptions.  Upon completion of this unit, students will be expected to interpret, integrate and demonstrate the structural, metabolic, and physiological function of the GI tract in a normal state.  Students will also be able to relate the normal state to the disease state.

Molecules, Cells, and Microbes (MCM)

Course #: MMCM102
Course Credit: 8
Directors:
     Rebecca Greenblatt, PhD (Microbiology/Immunology)
     Margaret Maimone, PhD (Cell and Developmental Biology)
Coordinator: 
     Sandra Jarvis

Molecules, Cells and Microbes (MCM) focuses on foundational medical knowledge and its application to disease mechanisms.  Successful students will learn foundational Microbiology, Virology, Parasitology, Cell and Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, Genetics, Developmental Biology and Immunology as part of this unit.  This material will be enhanced by frequent illustrations of Patient Care application, both within the lectures and in clinically-oriented small group courses (“Foundations of Reasoning in Medicine” and “Practice of Medicine”).

Musculoskeletal, Skin, Blood

Course #: MMSB101
Course Credit: 5
Directors: 
     Jim Greenwald, MD (Family Medicine)
     Matt Vilburn, DC (Cell and Developmental Biology)
     Diana Gilligan, MD, PhD (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology)
Coordinator:
     Julie Ritchie

This unit will cover the musculoskeletal system, skin and blood.  Students will learn the clinical implications of normal and microscopic anatomy of the extremities, including muscles, bones, neurovascular supply and joint structures.  The formation, degradation and function of blood will be discussed with emphasis on the process of maintaining homeostasis.  During this unit, students will be given multiple clinical cases to enhance their learning.  Learning will be enriched even further by case-based sessions, radiologic demonstrations, hands-on lab work, and clinically oriented small groups.

Nervous System

Course #: MNSY101
Course Credit: 6
Directors:
     Dana Mihaila, MD, PhD (Cell and Developmental Biology)
     James Megna, MD, PhD (Psychiatry)
     Mary Lou Vallano, PhD (Neuroscience and Physiology)
Coordinator:
    TBD

This unit is designed to provide students with current scientific knowledge of human nervous system structure and function, as well as to begin developing an understanding of how abnormalities in structure/function contribute to disease states. This will include a rudimentary exposure to, and appreciation of, how nervous system pathology manifests in abnormal clinical and laboratory findings.

Practice of Medicine I

Course #: MPOM105
Course Credit: 9
Directors:
      Joni Mitchell, MD (Curriculum Office)
      Alison McCrone, MD (Curriculum Office)
Coordinators:
      Meghan Freed
      Danielle Byrne, MPA

The Practice of Medicine course, spanning the first year of medical school, provides students with the skills, analytic tools, and ethical context to integrate basic and clinical scientific knowledge in a biopsychosocial model of healthcare. Through large group presentations and small group discussions and practice, the course provides instruction on medical interviewing; physical examination; preventive medicine; and ethical, legal and social issues in medicine.

Urinary, Respiratory II

Course #: MURR101
Course Credit: 4
Directors:
     Steve Grassl, PhD (Pharmacology)
     Beth Nicholas, MD (Emergency Medicine)

Coordinators:
     Francine Fischer

After completion of this unit, the student will be able to describe the micro and macro function of the urinary system. The student will demonstrate a strong understanding of the mechanisms of renal biology and physiology, in preparation for year two, when pharmacology and renal pathology will be discussed. These foundations will allow the student to successfully interpret clinical scenarios encompassing, but not limited to, laboratory studies, radiologic studies, and clinical case scenarios.